NARCAP Case 16 Part 3

 

Finally, Figure 12 shows frame 25 enlarged by the same amount as the previous images after the UAP has passed just beyond the wing tip (as noted by the location of the white wing tip light).

 

Figure 12. Enlarged Image of Aircraft's Left Wing Tip
after UAP has Passed Wing Tip (Frame 25)

Of particular interest are the two darker areas (above and below) the central lighter area of the UAP that are seen in Figures 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13. While they are visible in every frame showing the UAP they are absent above or below the airplane's intense, white wing tip lights. The cause of these darker regions is not known but might be related either to the presence of an opaque physical structure above and below the UAP's central lighted area that is of a dark color or other phenomenon where ambient light is not reflected toward the camera (perhaps absorbed?). These darker areas represent an interesting feature of these UAP that deserve further study.

3. UAP Image Dimensions : Table 3 presents the measured horizontal and vertical dimension, respectively, of the UAP's image(s) over a 2.5 second-long period soon after it appears (from 00:36.0 to 00:38.5). Column F gives the ratio of UAP image height (cf. Col. D) to airplane image tail height (cf. Col. E) for each of these 19 frames. When this ratio is multiplied by the actual height of the B777 tail (footnote 9) an approximation of the vertical height of the UAP can be obtained. Figure 13 shows that the corresponding data of Table 3 is variable; a straight line fit
(by eye) is also shown.

Note that both the tail height and vertical relative dimension of the UAP in Figure 13 tend to decrease over this brief measurement period as if both are receding away from the camera while the horizontal dimension of the UAP tends to increase slightly.

Table 3
Relative Dimensions of UAP and Airplane Tail Height as Measured from
Computer Screen Images at Constant Enlargement

Time (sec.)

 

 

Frame No.

 

 

Horizantal Dimension (mm)

 

Vertical Dimension (mm)

 

Airplane Tail Height(mm)

 

Ratio D/E

 

UAP Shape

 

UAP Color(s)

 

A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
36.0
1
5.0
3.4
13.6
0.25
rectangles orange-white
36.5
15
5.0
3.4
13.5
0.25
rectangles orange-white
37
1
3.6
2.7
13.3
0.20
rectangles orange-white
37.17
5
3.0
2.5
13.5
0.19
rectangles orange-white
37.20
6
3.8
2.7
13.4
0.20
rectangles orange-white
37.27
8
4.5
4.4
12.8
0.34
diag./rect (1) orange-white
37.33
10
3.8
3.0
14.9
0.20
rectangles whitish
37.40
12
5.4
4.0(2)
12.5
0.32
squares white-orange
37.47
14
4.8
3.8
12.7
0.30
rectangles whitish
37.53
16
5.0
3.5
12.4
0.28
rectangles(3) grey-white
37.57
17
5.5
2.6
12.4
0.21
rectangles white
37.63
19
4.2
2.5
12.6
0.20
rectangles orange-white(4)
37.77
23
3.7
1.0
12.6
0.08
rectangles whitish-yellow
37.80(7)
24
4.0
2.1
12.7
0.17
rectangles orange-white
37.83
25
6.4
1.2
12.8
0.09
rectangle very white
37.9
27
6.0
2.1
12.8
0.16
rectangles very white
37.93
28
3.8
1.2
12.8
0.09
rectangles(5) orange-white
38.0
1
4.6
2.0
13.2
0.15
rectangle orange-white
38.5
15
3.8
1.8
12.4
0.15
rectangles orange-white

 

Min. = 0.08
Mean = 0.17

Max = 0.34

Notes:

•  Three rectangular areas arranged in upper-left to lower-right orientation.

•  Three connected light sources.

3. Pixels are almost square, arranged from upper-left to lower-right, slightly blurred.
4. Pixels are in a horizontally oriented rectangle, slightly blurred.

5. Orange-white pixels at UAP but a very white single pixel is located half-way
between the UAP and the wing tip, embedded within an orange trail.

6. Tail height measured from its highest point to upper fuselage insertion point.

7. The UAP in this frame lies nearest the left wing.

Figure 13. Width (upper left) and Thickness (upper right) of UAP
and Aircraft Tail Height (lower left) over Same Time Period


4. UAP Physical Size Determination : The ratio of UAP height to the measured height of a visible airplane structure, viz., the vertical stabilizer, multiplied by the known height of the same structure provided an estimate of the approximate maximum physical size of the UAP assuming that the UAP was at about the same distance as the airplane (i.e., approx. 82,248 feet slant range) from the camera. Column F of Table 3 provides these ratios. The minimum ratio of 0.08 corresponds to a UAP height of 2.4 feet. The mean ratio of 0.17 corresponds to 5.1 feet and the maximum ratio of 0.34 to 10.2 feet. The mean value is taken as the most reasonable estimate of the height of the UAP.

5. UAP Pixel RGB Intensity Characteristics : Enlarged digital frames were made in order to measure the relative, red-green-blue integrated intensity of selected 3 x 3 pixel areas making up the center of each UAP jpeg image. This was done over most of the period the UAP was visible and of relatively constant intensity. The results are presented in Table 4. Also shown are the number of apparently separate UAP visible (Col. E), its apparent shape (Col. F) and color (Col. G).

 

Table 4
UAP 'Red/Green/Blue' Pixel Intensity Data
( 3 x 3 pixel area centered on UAP)
Time (min:sec)

Rel.UAP Intensity (L.light)

Rel.UAP Intensity (R.light) L.Wingtip Light Intensity No.of UAP UAP Shape UAP Color(s)
00:35.0
n/a
n/a
0
n/a
n/a
uap not visible
00:35.5
1
0
0
2
rectangular
reddish-orange
00:36.0
0
1
0
2
small point whitish
00:36.5
1
0
1
2
small point pinkish-orange
00:37.0
0
0
1
2
irreg. oval orange-white
00:37.5
1
1
2
2
irreg. oval orange-white
00:38.0
0
1
1
2
rectangular orange-white
00:38.5
0
0
2
2
rectangular orange-white
00:39.0
0
0
3
2
circular  
00:39.5
0
1
4
2
irreg. ovals whitish-orange
00:40.0
note 1
note 1
note 5
3
irreg. ovals  
00:40.5
note 2
note 2
 
3
lg rectangle  
00:41.0
0
0
 
1
irreg. oval  
00:41.5
0
0
 
1
irreg. area  
00:42.0
note 3
note 3
 
3
elongated  
00:42.5
note 4
note 4
 
3
circular  

____________________________________________________________________________
Notes:
1. Frame showed three separate luminous areas whose relative intensities were: left = 1,
center = 0, right = 0
2. Ditto: left = 1, center = 0, right = 1
3. Ditto: left = 0, center = 0, right = 0
4. Ditto: left = 0, center = 1, right = 4
5. Airplane's left wingtip light is out of frame from here on.


It may be noted that these relative intensities range from minimum or dark (255 levels; i.e., 8 bit resolution) to maximum or most intense (0 level). It is not possible to determine how much the 0 intensity level pixels might be over-saturated. Indeed, it is likely that UAP intensity extended well above the maximum level (100,000 lux) measured by this camera. These values only represent relative intensity that cannot be quantified in usual photometric units. The airplane's left wingtip corresponding light intensity values are given in column D of Table 4. They are also at the extreme upper end of the intensity scale.

 

Figure 14 shows the results of relative intensity measurements made on the frame following Figure 12 along five vertical scan lines. The UAP has passed just to the left of the wing tip light. Note that the shadow on the underside of the wing is approximately as dark as the dark regions above and below the UAP's bright center area. The most intense regions are the wing tip light (value of 1) and the UAP (value of 0). The background sky luminance values range typically from 6 to 7.

Figure 14. Left Wing Tip Area with Relative Pixel Intensity Measurements
Across Five Vertical Scans

Sky luminance was constant at around a value of 7 (as in all other frames), however the wing tip light and also what is called the “secondary UAP” had an intensity of 2. The most intense part of the UAP measured 0 as found in both the preceding and following frames. Again, it is not possible to determine the UAP's absolute intensity from these data but it was more intense than the wing tip lights.

 

Figure 15. Relative Pixel Intensity Measurements Along an Arbitrary Line
Showing "Secondary UAP" Behind Main UAP

6. UAP Spectral Characteristics : Only relative spectral characteristics of the UAP were available from the digital video. Nothing was known about the camera's color balance, color calibration values or gamma setting. The Canon FV-1 uses a CCD whose spectral response extends out to approximately one (1) m just beyond the visible spectrum.(footnote 10) Human vision near the line of sight is sensitive to wavelengths extending to about 720 nm while more peripherally located rod-receptor vision extends only to about 670 nm. Since this UAP could not be perceived visually, but only while viewing it on the camera's digital display, it had to be emitting wavelengths longer than 720 nm, i.e., in the near infra-red.

General color names are given in Table 3 and 4 for the UAP. The UAP appeared to be an orange-white in most of the frames; this could be an artifact of the CCD used in the camera. Since the UAP was invisible to human vision, however, it is misleading to even refer to a color name that depends on human perception. More research is called for in regard to the appearance of digitally displayed images of infrared sources possessing different wavelengths.

Of particular interest is the single frame at time 00:37.933 (37 sec. frame 28; cf. Fig. 16) where a definite reddish trail is seen behind the UAP with a single very white, intense pixel located about half-way between the UAP center and the wing tip light. This is the only frame on which such a colored trail was found. Perhaps this very small “secondary UAP” might be some kind of atmospheric electrostatic discharge remnant left by the larger UAP. However, neither the reddish trail nor the single pixel appear in the following frame 1/30 th second later.

7. UAP Shape : The digital resolution of the camera made it difficult to determine the shape of the angularly small UAP. Based upon a visual inspection of the non-enlarged frames the UAP appears generally oval, circular, or sometimes rectangular (cf. Col. F in Table 4). When selected frames were greatly enlarged (employing jpeg compression) one sees that the UAP now appears in familiar rectangular and square shapes (cf. Col. G in Table 3). Perhaps the safest generalization concerning UAP shape is that in uncompressed imagery it appears as a squashed, horizontally oriented oval of light with a darker area located directly above and below its center.
This is shown in Figure 16 which is an uncompressed video screen capture of two adjacent UAP seen fairly late in the sequence after Mr. K.A. had zoomed in.

 

 

Figure 16. Vertical Raster (T.V.) Zoomed Screen Image Showing Double UAP
with Dark Areas Above and Below Each Intense Center

8. How the UAP Disappeared : It is always instructive to understand how UAP disappear since this detail may help understand the energistic mechanism(s) associated with the phenomenon. The present UAP simply became dimmer over the last twenty seconds (starting at 2 min. 50 sec.) until it was no longer detectable by the video camera (at about 3 min. 10 sec). Since the level of optical zoom isn't known precisely nothing definitive can be said about the amount of photic energy from the UAP falling on the camera's CCD sensor. It is clear that the zoom level did not change during the final five to ten seconds before the UAP disappeared. Mr. K. A. wrote that the UAP dimmed when he zoomed in too far. This fact suggests that the UAP's photic intensity was so low after zooming in that by spreading the photons upon more and more pixels the lower sensitivity threshold of the CCD was reached and the image therefore no longer registered as being present. Of course this assumes that the UAP's photic output remained constant during this period. The lower level of sensitivity is given as two lux (equivalent to 0.190 ft-c or 0.20 milliphot) by the manufacturer.

While the intensity of the UAP seems to decrease prior to its final disappearance its frontal area does not, suggesting that it did not merely flay away into the distance but reduced its energy output.

 

Summary and Conclusions

It is quite clear that this UAP was not any of a number of known kinds of light sources. For instance, it was not a flare launched from the ground because of its long duration, lack of smoke trail and the fact that it wasn't seen visually. The UAP was not an astronomical body such as a planet, star, the Sun or the Moon because it was too small, the Sun had already set and the Moon was in a different direction in the sky, and the UAP disappeared in a matter of minutes and a part of it appeared to split off. And it could not have been a meteorite due to its relatively long sighting duration.

This incident may or may not qualify as an aviation safety event depending upon several factors. One of them is whether the UAP was visible to the naked eye – particularly the eyes of the flight crew on board the jet airplane. If it was visible then its presence could have caused them to abort the landing or make another unplanned or uncoordinated flight maneuver. If the UAP could be seen from the airport tower then it might have disrupted normal approach and departure procedures there. Another factor is whether the UAP could have caused some kind of electromagnetic disturbance onboard the jet and/or airport electronic systems. It isn't known whether the UAP was detected on airport radar or witnessed by the airplane's flight crew. A third factor is how near the UAP actually flew to the jet airplane. Our analysis suggests that the UAP passed somewhere between the airplane and the camera and not beyond it, however, the airplane did not appear to alter its course or flight attitude during this event. The identity of the UAP remains unidentified at this time.

Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank Mrs. Samiko for her help in translating the voice track on the tape.

 

Footnotes:

9) Boeing gives the height from the ground to top of the vertical stabilizer when the B777-300 is taxiing as 18.52 m (60.80 ft.). The vertical distance from the top of the fuselage (at the stabilizer's insertion
point) to the top of the vertical stabilizer is approximately 9.1 m (29.9 ft.) which is used in calcu-
lations of the size of the UAP.

10) Wald, G. Human vision and the spectrum. Science , vol. 101, pp. 653-658, 1945.

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